Fixed Speed-Safe

Speed enforcement issues with vehicles driven over the speed limit are a problem all around the world – particularly in zones where people are either nearby or crossing the road. Such areas often already have a reduced speed limit to minimize accidents, and include school zones, hospitals, residential areas or other places with a high volume of pedestrians, especially children and elderly people.

Enforcing speed limits is time-consuming and dangerous for law enforcement officers. The solution is Sensys America's Speed-Safe, a speed enforcement solution that captures speed violations with state-of-the-art digital camera technology. The Fixed Speed-Safe system can be permanently placed in areas that are particularly known for dangerous speeding. When signs are posted that the area is photo enforced, speeding violators will either slow down or learn the hard way by receiving a ticket.

Sensys America speed enforcement solution - Speed-Safe

NATIONAL SAFE KIDS CAMPAIGN®

SPEED SURVEY RESULTS FOR 63 SCHOOL ZONES, SEPTEMBER 2000

  • One third (32.7%) of drivers were traveling at speeds of 30 mph or above.
  • 6.6% were traveling 40 mph or above.
  • Two-thirds (65.3%) of all vehicles were traveling over the posted speed limit.
  • Almost one quarter (23%) of vehicles were traveling at least 10 mph in excess of the posted speed limit.
  • Nine out of ten (88.9%) schools had at least one safety measure present.
  • More than 10% had none.
  • A total of 16.714 vehicle speeds were captured in 63 school zones located in 29 cities across the United States.
  • The average vehicle speed collected in the survey, regardless of posted speed limit, was 26 mph.
  • The percentage traveling over the speed limit varied by site, with most speeders in the lowest posted speed zone.
  • There was no significant difference in vehicle speeds in the morning compared to the afternoon.
  • Posted speed limits ranged from 15 mph to 35 mph with the most (38%) at 25 mph.
  • According to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign® across the United States in the year 2000, pedestrian injuries are the second leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children aged 5 to 14. Each year, 650 pedestrians aged 14 and under die in motor-vehicle-related traffic accidents in the United States. An additional 20,000 children suffer from motor-vehicle-related pedestrian injuries. The total annual cost of traffic-related pedestrian death and injury among children aged 14 and under is more than $7.2 billion.